eScience Workshop
2005.1.25 (tue) & 2005.1.27(thur)                                                                                                <updated on 2005.02.01>

Organizer - Chris Elvidge
Objective:
To explore facilities and technologies for interactive science enabled by high bandwidth connectivity.

Exploring eScience Session 1:  Thailand e-science/computational science

Time: 2005.1.25 (tue)
 11:00-12:30
Place: Room D 
 

(origional proposal)







Session Chair: Piyawut  Srichaikul, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center
Abstract:
Computational Science research has been promoted in Thailand for several years.  It has become more popular and active, thanks to the rapid improvement of  infrastructures such as computing resources and network connectivity in the recent past. Today, computational science will go through another reforming step due to grid computing and e-science which emerge and converge from multidisciplinary field of science and technology and networking.
This session demonstrate a few example of different computational science research applications which could become a necessity in Asia Pacific region.  They illustrate some common patterns in their infrastructure and relationship with e-science.

Presentations:
- Environmental Modeling in Southern Thailand,  K. Jaroensutasinee, Walailak University
  Abstract
- Building a Massive Virtual Screening using Grid Infrastructure, Chak Sangma, Kasetsart University
  Abstract
- Computational Chemistry and Biology on inhibitor design, active against HIV-1 RT , S. Hannongbua, Kasetsart University
  Abstract
- CFD role in Thailand's Electronics Manufacturing,  E. Juntasaro, Suranaree University of Technology
  Abstract
- Session Remarks 

 

Exploring eScience Session 2:
Collaboratories


Time: 2005.1.27 (thur)
 9:00-10:30
Place: Room B 
 

(origional proposal)

Session Chair: Jane Hunter, Distributed Systems Technology CRC, University of Queensland
Abstract:
"Collaboratories" is the term given to large-scale scientific research environments that involve teams of geographically dispersed scientists working together to solve complex scientific problems, through high speed networked access to distributed data repositories, specialised scientific equipment, knowledge services, and computing power. This session will focus on the latest collaborative tools and services being developed to support both formal and informal, realtime and asynchronous collaborative activities between remotely located researchers and resources.

1) Collaboratory for Research on Electronic Work (
http://www.crew.umich.edu/index.html)Thomas Finholt, School of Information, University of Michigan (remote presentation).
2) Making tele-presence work or Making the AG work better , Markus Buchhorn, Internet Futures Project, Australian National University
(remote presentation).
3) Secure Collaboratories, Jane Hunter, DSTC, "The FUSION project - an expanding knowledge spiral for nano-materials design". 

 

Exploring eScience Session 3:
Facility Instruments


Time: 2005.1.27 (thur)
 11:00-12:30
Place: Room B 
  

(origional proposal)

Session Chair: Simon See
Abstract:
The session will be devoted to an exploration and demonstration of UCLP
(
http://www.canarie.ca/canet4/uclp/uclp_software.html). UCLP stands for "User Control LightPath" and it has
been co-funded by Cisco Canada and CANARIE under CANARIE's Directed Research Program. The UCLP software
allows end users to self provision and dynamically reconfigure optical (layer one) networks (i.e. create cross-connections
on switches) within a single domain or across multiple independent management domains.


Tentative Title of presentation:

1) CANARIE's  User Controlled LightPath (UCLP)Software, Huerve Guy, CANARIE and others
(more detail)

 

 Exploring eScience Session 4:
Toward a semantic web for digital data archives


Time: 2005.1.27 (thur)
 14:00-15:30
Place: Room B 
  

(origional proposal)

presentations

Session Chair: Chris Elvidge

Abstract:
Immense quantities of digital data and images are now archived and publicly available through the web. These include domain-specific data archives, covering such domains as weather and climate, seismology and geophysics, astronomy and particle physics, as well as images and digital copies of non-textual human cultural production. Describing, cataloguing, searching and locating information within digital data and image archives is one of the grand technological challenges of the semantic web era. This session will draw together participants from diverse fields of science and the humanities to share their experience on metadata, standards and techniques for access to large digital archives.  

Tentative Title of presentation:
1) Issues for participating in the semantic web for digital data archives in the humanities: the case of PARADISEC, Linda Barwic, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (abstract) (remote presentation).
2) DELAMAN, Peter Wittenburg (
remote presentation).
3) APBioGrid, APBioBox, APBioKnoppix, Laboratory Workflow Integrationand BioManufacturing Workflow in Life Sciences, Tan Tin Wee, National University of Singapore (abstract)
4) Earth System Grid, Don Middleton, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado USA
5)
The Hierarchical Data Format for EOS (HDF-EOS), Richard Ullman (via Chris Elvidge), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland USA