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                                                                                                <updated on 2005.8.19>

APAN 101| Trust Fed | Global Coll 1 | Gobal Coll 2| Grid 1| Grid 2 | Digital Divide BoF

APAN 101


Date: 23rd August 2005
Time: 17:30 - 18:30

Place: Room E
       

Organizing chairs:

Objectives:

Session Plan:

 

National Authentication and Authorization Infrastructures

Date: 24th August 2005
Time: 11:00 - 12:30

Place: Room A

Organizing Chairs:
Heather Boyles, Internet2
heather@internet2.edu
+1.202.331.5342

Objectives:
National Authentication and Authorization Infrastructures and NRENs:
a discussion of current national AAI activities, their relevance to research and education networks and the role of NRENs in national AAIs


This session will provide an overview of the existing and emerging national authentication and authorization infrastructures in several countries around the world (including Australia, UK, Switzerland, the US and more). It will also discuss the importance of AAIs in supporting emerging research and education networking uses, including authenticating and authorizing users of on-demand 'lightpath' type circuits across our networks; exchange of security incidence information between NREN NOCs; providing secure access to each other's performance measurement and monitoring tools and data; supporting authenticated video-conferencing; and authenticating visiting users of our campus wireless networks (e.g. EduRoam effort).

Session Plan:

ii)name and contact details of the speakers

Heather Boyles, Internet2, USA - moderator
James Sankar, AARNET, Australia
Keith Hazelton, University of Wisconsin-Madison/Internet2, USA
Yasuo Okabe, Kyoto University, Japan

iii)title and abstract of the presentations

- An Update on the AARNet Middleware Programme
James Sankar, AARNET, Australia

Abstract: The first part of the presentation will be an update on the progress made since the Middleware Forum/Camp that took place in December 2004. James Sankar will present AARNets middleware action plan and will highlight the priority tasks taking place during 2005. The presentation will also include the results of a recent survey of identity and access management systems in Australian universities and research organisations and some conclusions on what the results mean for the development of middleware activities in Australia.

- Maturation and Convergence in Authentication and Authorization Services in the US
Keith Hazelton, U. Wisconsin-Madison, USA

Abstract: NSF-supported efforts of the Internet2 Middleware Initiative in the US have now produced software, specifications and process recommendations for a robust and full-featured middleware layer centered on Authentication and Authorization (AuthNZ) services. As support for Virtual Organizations (VOs) becomes a more pressing issue, national and global attention is now turning to the crucial questions around federated identity and access management. This presentation will highlight Internet2 achievements from
Shibboleth to new software for distributable management of group, affiliation and privilege information to enrich the AuthNZ service
environment. It will also point to recent efforts around the definition and organization of multi-institutional federations as we move toward a world increasingly characterized by globally distributed, discipline-centric and research agenda-driven virtual organizations.

- UPKI -- Interuniversity Authentication and Authorization Platform for Japanese Cyber-Science Infrastructure
Yasuo Okabe, Kyoto University, Japan

Abstract:
National Institute of Informatics (NII) and information infrastructure centers in the seven universities (Hokkaido, Tohoku, Tokyo, Nagoya, Kyoto, Osaka and Kyushu) have been conducting researches and developement toward Cyber-Science Infrastructure (CSI), the next-generation academic information infrastructure for interuniversity collaboration. UPKI is the authentication and authorization platform of CSI, and a challenge of it is deployment of PKI in many applications, which includes SSO of Web services, e-mail singature/encryption, wireless LAN roaming, VPN, and the Grid.
 

 

Global Collaboration I

Date: 24th August 2005
Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Place: Room A

Organizing Chairs:

Jacqueline Brown
Pacific Northwest Gigapop and Pacific Wave
+1 206 331 1550
 

Objectives:
The speakers will provide overviews of the many developments in national and international advanced networking in which their organizations are participating.
 

Session Plan:

- SINET Update
Jun Matsukata

Abstract: The overall topology of SINET national backbone remained unchanged though we had changes of carriers of many portions of SINET including the 10 Gbps backbone circuits by April 2005. As for the upgrade of international connectivity which took place by April 2005, an OC48 between Tokyo and Pacific Wave at LA came into operation, and the four OC48s between Tokyo and New York became a single OC192.

- Connecting the World with Light
Andrew Howard

Abstract: This presentation will cover AARNet's involvement in a number of current global infrastructure and application initiatives, including the Global Lambda Infrastructure Facility (GLIF), the Trans-Eurasian Information Network (TEIN2), the Global Astronomy Initiative, development and implementation of immersive multimedia collaborations, e-VLBI and middleware initiatives and federations. The role that SXTransPORT and User-Controlled Lightpaths will play will also be covered.

- The Status of JGNII
Asako Toyoda

Abstract: The speaker will address the current status of JGNII as well as the future plans.

- IETF IPv4/IPv6 Coexistence and Transition Discussions
Fred Baker, Chair IPv6 Operations Working Group

Abstract: The speaker will discuss progress in the IETF regarding the coexistence and transition of the network from IPv4 to IPv6. This will include discussions of dual stack interoperation and various transition mechanisms.
 

 

Global Collaboration 2

Date: 24th August 2005
Time: 16:00 - 17:30

Place: Room A
       

Organizer/Chair:

Jacqueline Brown
Pacific Northwest Gigapop and Pacific Wave
+1 206 331 1550

Objectives:
The speakers will provide overviews of the many developments in national and international advanced networking in which their organizations are participating.
 

Session Plan:

- Pacific Wave Status Report and Future Plans
John Silvester

Abstract: Pacific Wave is a distributed international research and education exchange on the West Coast of the USA. In this talk we will report on recent developments in PacificWave including addition of an additional exchange point and beefing up connectivity between Los Aneles and Seattle in preparation for iGrid '05 (San Diego) and Supercomputing '05 (Seattle). We will give a status report on the the NSF-IRNC program that is supporting the development of PacifcWave and several of the international connections that land there. We will also report on our plans to expand service offering to incorporate optical switching and "GLIF-like" (aka lightpath) services.

- Global Ring Network for Advanced Applications Development (GLORIAD) [remote presentation]
Greg Cole and Natasha Bulashova

Abstract: The Global Ring Network for Advanced Applications Development rings the northern hemisphere of the earth in an ambitious effort to link with advanced network services the R&E communities of the six organizing nations – China, US, Russia, Korea, Netherlands and Canada - with the broader global S&E community. Currently providing 155-, 622- and 2500-Mbps circuits around its path, GLORIAD received in late December, 2004 a five-year US funding commitment from the US NSF (as part of an international package of funding with its partners) to develop a hybrid (layer-1, -2, -3) network, aiming for multiple 10 Gbps wavelengths around the earth by 2008, all serving the global science and education community.
 

 

Grid 1

Date: 24th August 2005
Time: 11:00 - 12:30

Place: Room D  
       

Organizer/Chair(s):
Kento Aida, TITECH, aida@alab.ip.titech.ac.jp
Putchong Uthayapas, KU, pu@ku.ac.th
Seishi Ninomiya, NARO-NARC, snino@affrc.go.jp
 

Objectives:
Grid computing is an important emerging paradigm for organizing and sharing computing, network, storage and instrument resources in large-scale applications. The Grid workshop brings together participants from academia, industry and government to learn and to discuss about grid activities in the APAN countries. The workshop is organized by two sessions, the tutorial session of Grid middleware and the technical session of updated grid research topics.

Session Plan:

- Tutorial: Technology of the Grid
Kento Aida, TITECH, aida@alab.ip.titech.ac.jp

Abstract: The Grid is an important emerging paradigm for organizing and sharing computing, network, storage and instrument
resources on networks. This tutorial lectures about fundamental technologies of the Grid. The topics include component technologies to construct the Grid, e.g. security, resource management, information service, job management and etc. Some projects about middleware and infrastructures of the Grid are also introduced.
 

 

Grid 2

Date: 24th August 2005
Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Place: Room D
       

Organizer/Chair:
Kento Aida, TITECH, aida@alab.ip.titech.ac.jp
Putchong Uthayapas, KU, pu@ku.ac.th
Seishi Ninomiya, NARO-NARC, snino@affrc.go.jp

Objectives:
Grid computing is an important emerging paradigm for organizing and sharing computing, network, storage and instrument resources in large-scale applications. The Grid workshop brings together participants from academia, industry and government to learn and to discuss about grid activities in the APAN countries. The workshop is organized by two sessions, the tutorial session of Grid middleware and the technical session of updated grid research topics.
 

Session Plan:

- Taiwan Knowledge Innovation National Grid, From Research to Business
Whey Fone, Deputy Director, National Center for High-performance Computing, Taiwan

Abstract: Taiwan has initiated a four-year (2003~2006) national grid project, Knowledge Innovation National Grid (KING), an advanced and collaborative high-performance computing environment for scientific applications and technology development. The National Center for High-performance Computing (NCHC) has been responsible of conducting KING project since 2003. The KING project $B!G (Bs infrastructure includes grid resource planning, integration into specialized grids, the development of grid-supporting technology, and pilot application realization. It also encompasses collaborations with HPC alliances, application consortiums, and international organizations. KING $B!G (Bs twin project, the TaiWan Advanced Research & Education Network (TWAREN), is a world-class island-wide R&D network made up of a high bandwidth 20Gbps backbone. NCHC $B!G (Bs three resource centers (Hsinchu in the north, Taichung in the center, and Tainan in the south) are all linked via the TWAREN network and, thus, able to share grid resources and use supporting technologies. Examples of such shared grid resources include high-end networking, cluster computing, and storage. Examples of supporting grid technologies include sensor networks, Access grid, and advanced visualization. KING is an applications-driven project that focuses on life-improving applications such as e-learning grid, Ecology grid, Medical grid, Flood Mitigation grid, and Biology grid. In order to fully realize the potential that grid computing has to offer, the NCHC has formed alliances and consortiums with various Taiwan-based HPC & domain-technology experts. Also, the NCHC has been working closely with international grid-related organizations. So far grid is still considered by many to be somewhat difficult to use. To help make grid easier to use, a clearer definition of the interface between workflow and people should be established. Moreover, to run a successful business grid, it is necessary that a user-friendly interface be developed as well as be ensured that application customization exists.

- Next generation research and education network support for Grid computing in Thailand
Panjai Tantasanawang, Deputy Director, Uninet

Abstract: In order to drive science and technology development, strong computing infrastructure is strongly needed. This infrastructure comprises of massive computing and storages resources, high speed network that link them together, and middleware and application enable users to utilize such resources effectively. Grid computing plays an important role as an enabling technology here. This talk will present a recent development in providing high speed network for research and education support in Thailand. In addition, current on-going effort on using grid computing to link and share resources across this next generation network infrastructure will be presented. It has been found that one of the key issues is how to stimulate more end users to use this advanced infrastructure to develop useful and innovative applications.

- Building the e-Science Infrastructure in Asia
Simon C. Lin and Eric Yen, ASCC

Abstract:

 

Digital Divide BoF

Date: 25th August 2005
Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Place: Room C
       

Organizer/Chair:

Prof. Han-Chieh Chao, National Dong Hwa University, Taiwan
E-mail: hcc@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, Tel: +886-3-8634066, Fax: +886-3-8634060

Objectives:

Affordable technologies for bridging the digital divide

Session Plan:

Number of speakers:
3

- Community Based ICT Infrastructure in Indonesia: A 12+ Years Experiences (30 mins)
Dr. Onno W. Purbo, An Ordinary Indonesian, onno@indo.net.id

Abstract: This report is based on my personal 12+ years experience in attempting to build a financially sustainable community based information infrastructure in Indonesia. I may very much bias to my Indonesian experience. All activities are driven by a simple vision, to see a knowledge-based society in Indonesia. ICT is believed to be the tool of choice to accomplish the task. No available funding is assumed. Thus, all activities must be self-finance & invested by the people to gain a long term sustainability. Maintain a self-finance & sustainable process under intervention of international bodies or donor agencies is the most difficult task. Most people will likely to assume that international bodies would likely to bring free funding for them. It may work for pilot projects; the process may unfortunately stop as soon as the funding source dried up.

Similarly in most government approaches, bridging a digital divide with imbedded divide policy framework (operator vs. common user) and no room for community-based infrastructure seems to be arguable. Not to mention the highly corrupt environment. Significant part of the existing regulatory framework became an obstacle against our effort intended for peopleâ?Ts movement, and, thus, leads to unnecessary casualties in some cases.

My experience shows that it would be much easier to initiate a self-finance sustainable process if there is no funding from any donor agency to begin with. We can easily see the committed individuals & successful approaches in a free donor / government zone. Care has to be carefully planned to inject funding in a self-finance & sustainable process. Key successes rely heavily on ability to create a tacit knowledge exchange platform enabling knowledge producing young authors follow up by education processes focused on scaling & replicating the process for high impact to the society. Open source, open document, copy left movement would be significant. All processes are self-finance. It has nothing to do with the technological superiority of the equipments. Adjustment should be made for different countries & regulatory environment.

As a result, after 12+ years of struggle, from few Internet user, no cybercafe, no school on the Internet, not much book and IT magazine in Indonesia. In 2005, today, we have 13-15 million Internet users, 2000-3000 cybercafes, 4000 schools on the Internet, 15.000+ Outdoor WiFi Installation for neighborhood network, hundred of books & magazine on ICT and hundreds of ICT authors supported by 50.000+ active mailing lists and unaccountable number of Indonesian webs & blogs that drives the ICT movement in Indonesia.

The catch would be in the ability to identify & to work with informal (most likely underground) visionary leaders / pioneers in the country / area. It would unfortunately be very difficult to find one through formal (government) channels.

- Affordable tools for SMEs (30 mins)
Ms. Janette C. Toral

Abstract: There are numerous things that can be done online today which SMEs can use to promote their business. This session will discuss available free and low-cost technologies being used by SMEs and entrepreneurs that have bridged the digital divide and allowed them to prosper. Technologies to be discussed include open source tools for content management system and e-learning. Affordable tools for online payment. Mobile phones, GPRS/EDGE based Internet access, community telecenters, money remittance systems for online payment acceptance, low-cost Internet marketing tools, etc.

- Develop a community-centered and sustainable telecenter in remote areas. (20 mins)
Mr. Michael Yu-chuan Lin

Abstract: Based on the experiences from the implementation of APEC Telecenter Development Program, this session will explore how to build a successful model for sustainable telecenter development in rural areas. Some real best practices of telecenters will be demonstrated as well.