Plenaries                                                             <updated on 2005.8.23>

Opening | HDT | Sensor Network | General Assembly I | General Assembly II

Opening Plenary

Date: 24th August 2005
Time: 9:00-10:30

Place: Room A & B  

Organizing chairs: S. Lin
Objectives:

Session Plan:

Title: Network Research and Research Networks
Fred Baker

Abstract: Mr. Baker will discuss research in networking and innovative styles of networks being deployed, with the markets and projects they facilitate and the issues they encounter. These will include high speed fiber networks, wireless, and occasional access networks such as IP/3GPP.

Title: Future Internet Developments: Evolution or Flag Days
John C Klensin

Abstract: Developments of the Internet in the last two decades have been largely evolutionary ones: new systems, protocols, and applications have been developed and put into use without either major network disruptions or the necessity to stop everything and make a “flag day” transition. Yet the adoption of TCP/IP (and IPv4) itself required such a flag day. This talk will examine the conditions that require flag day-style transitions, whether we can continue to avoid them, and what we do if one becomes unavoidable.

 

Huge Data Transfer Plenary

Date: 26th August 2005
Time: 9:00-10:30
Place: Room A & B

Organizing Chairs:

Herve Guy
CANARIE INC.
110 O'Connor, 4th floor, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1P 5M9
email: herve.guy@canarie.ca
tel: +1.613.944-5606

Objectives:

Around the world there are many large remote sensor and instrumentation projects whose data output will need to be delivered to computing facilities many thousands of kilometers away. Examples of such facilities include the European eVLBI project - JIVE, and of course, the granddaddy of them all the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In some cases the expected data flow demands of these projects, in terms of throughput and duration will easily exceed by order of magnitude, that of conventional Internet traffic flows. This plenary session will try to figure out How Scientifics and Network Architects are taking up the “Huge Data Transfer” challenge that will meet these requirements.

Session Plan:

i ) Number of speakers: 5
ii)Name and contact details of the speakers

Name: George McLaughlin, Director, International Developments (via videoconference)
Organisation: AARNet
email: george.mclaughlin@aarnet.edu.au
Tel +61 411 256 370

Name: Mark Prior, Chief Technology Officer (in person)
Organisation: AARNet
email: mark.prior@aarnet.edu.au
tel: +61 414 725 855

Title: Planning for massive data transfers - issues and challenges

Abstract:

The massive data transfers that will form part of the emerging tapestry of new ways of undertaking science give rise to a new range of issues to be addressed so that optimum use of new network and communication paradigms by researchers are simple and straightforward.

Name: Kei Hiraki (in person)
Organization: University of Tokyo
email: hiraki@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp <mailto:hiraki@is.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp>

Title: Realization and Utilization of high-BW TCP on real application

Abstract:

Very long-distance high-BW TCP technology has been established by combination of transmission-rate-control technology, TCP acceleration hardware and latest high performance servers. But we still have difficulties to fully utilize this level of network performance in actual application field. In this talk, we will present basic technologies to enable high-BW TCP data transfer, and discuss on its application to disk-to-disk data replication and to PFLOPS class supercomputers.

Name: Wade Hong (in person)
Organisation: Carleton University
Address: 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1S 5B6
email: xiong@physics.carleton.ca

Name: Corrie Kost (?)
Name: Steve McDonald (?)
Organization: TRIUMF
Address: 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3
email: kost@triumf.ca
email: mcdonald@triumf.ca

Title: Huge Data Transfer Experimentation over Lightpaths    (ppt presentation)

Abstract:

In this presentation we will present our experimentation with bulk data disk to disk transfers over high speed long distance networks. These experiments conducted as part of the CA*net 4 International Grid Testbed (IGT) demonstrated the viability of 10GbE end to end lightpaths for large scale scientific experiments. A challenge is to achieve high performance utilizing commodity computing hardware.

Name: Jing-Jou Yen, Division Manager
Organisation: National Center for High-Performance Computing
Address: Taiwan
email: jjyen@nchc.org.tw

Title: SDSS Data Transfer

Abstract:

National Center for High-Performance Computing (NCHC) has a joint program with the Fermi Laboratories to mirror the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) data. NCHC sets up a lightpath in its "TaiWan Advanced Research and Education Network (TWAREN)” for the SDSS data transfer. This speeds up the SDSS information sharing for physicists working in universities and institutes in Taiwan. This session provides the experience sharing of NCHC efforts with regard to three network set-ups, network operations, applications as well as the future development plan.

Name: Chris Elvidge (via videoconference)
Organisation: Earth Observation Group, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center,
email: chris.elvidge@noaa.gov

Title: Data Transfer Challenges For NOAA's Satellite Data Archives

Abstract:

The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is one of the world's largest collectors of earth observation satellite data. The data are initially processed at a centralized facility near Washington, DC for use in operational weather forecasting and tracking environmental events such as drought, fire and sea surface temperature anomalies. The processed data are also transferred electronically to the NOAA Data Centers located in Asheville, North Carolina and Boulder, Colorado for long term archive and use by the scientific community. With each new generation of satellites, data volumes go up substantially. The next major step up in data volumes will occur in 2008, when the NPP satellite is launched. NPP will produce approximately 2-3 TB of data per day. The presentation will review the challenges facing the NOAA satellite data archives in light of recent data transfer rate test results.

 

Sensor Network Plenary

Date: 26th August 2005
Time: 11:00 - 12:30
Place: Room A & B

Organizing Chairs:
Yasuichi Kitamura
(kita@jp.apan.net, +81-42-327-6916)

Objectives:
Network research activites are driven by a lot of impacts from the other regions which researchers never expect. These days, most of the communications are tend to move to the IP protocol. Even if the local network is isolated from the outside worlds, the one is ready for having the communication with others because they are using the such seamless protocol. This session will show you one of the hottest topics from such world.


Session Plan:

Masayuki Hirafuji/Hirafuji@affrc.go.jp, National Agricultural Research Center
Takuji Kiura/kiura@affrc.go.jp, National Agricultural Research Center

Title: Present status and perspective of global sensor network

Abstract:
So far many kinds of sensor network technologies are proposed. Already prototypes of sensor networks have been constructed such as our Field Server system and NASA’s Sensor Web, and enormous data has been accumulated. If data of environmental condition observed by sensor networks is open on the Internet, data-grid technologies such as MetBroker can make it a virtual huge weather database automatically combining with conventional weather databases.Field Server is a Web server which can be installed in fields, and Field Monitoring Server (FMS) is a kind of Field Servers for monitoring. We are developing Field Storage Server (FSS) also for data collection and data storage in fields to consume effectively on- site distributed natural energies such as solar energy and wind energy. Field Servers installed at sites in several courtiers constitute a global sensor network trough the Internet. Collaboration toward global sensor network has been encouraged by APAN meetings for several years.Sensors embedded in FMSs are air-temperature, humidity, intensity of solar radiation, leaf wetness, soil moisture, CO2 concentration, UV, IR, CCD/CMOS camera and so on. Field Servers are connected by Wi-Fi (Wireless-LAN) respectively using mesh network or WDS (Wireless Distributed System), and simultaneously Field Servers provide hotspot service. That is, Field Servers are both wireless sensor network and infrastructure for ubiquitous networking. Measured data by FMSs are stored as distributed XML databases by Fieldserver-Agent, which is an AI system to collect data of FMSs and to control Field Servers automatically. Collected data by FMSs and conventional weather databases are combined automatically as a huge virtual database by MetBroker, which is a middle ware for data-grid. So far FMSs have been installed at dozens of sites in several countries such as Japan, USA, Thailand, China, Korea, Syria and Filliping. So far 1TB data per a year have been collected, and it will be more than PB per a year by installing more FMSs.

 

General Assembly I

Date: 27 August 2005
Time: 9:00 - 10:30

Place: Room A & B  

Organizing chair:

Shigeki Goto
email: goto@goto.info.waseda.ac.jp

Objectives:

Session Plan:

- Organizing for Optical Infrastructure: The Internet2 and National Lambda Rail Collaboration
Vice-President Ron Johnson, Computing & Communications, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

- TEIN2 update by David West (over the video from DANTE, 30min)

- TransPAC2 Update by Jim Williams (10 mins)

- Country reports some members of APAN and some potential members of APAN

 

General Assembly II

Date: 27 August 2005
Time: 11:00 - 12:30

Place: Room A & B  

Organizing chair:

Shigeki Goto
email: goto@goto.info.waseda.ac.jp

Objectives:

Session Plan:

- Presentation on Pakistan Education and Research Network (J. Memon)

- ANF(APAN-KR) status report (DY Kim)

- APAN NOC & Network Engineering (Konishi)

- Report on NRW (Xing Li)

- Update on activities within the Internet2 community as an international partner of APAN (H.Boyles)

- Country report by Vietnam & Indonesia

- Report from APAN Secretariat (D.Krairit)

- Program Committee Report (BG Joo)

- Report about on IPv6 TF Meeting (Jianping Wu)

- Report from Network Technology Area (Stephen Kingham)

- Event Committee Report (Akira Mizushima)

- Fellowship Program Committee Report (An Jie)

- Advisory Committee (L.Wong)

 

Summary:

* The following primary members have representative in this General Assembly
AARNET, SingAREN, APAN-TH, APAN-CN, APAN-MY, APAN-TW, APAN-PK, APAN-JP, ANF

No representative for the following primary members: NGI-NZ, HARNET, ASTI, ERNET, LEARN

* Medical WG is accepted
* Medical WG will be the name and a review can be conducted next meeting if there are other suggestions later as to the appropriateness of the name
* The status of Multimedia WG will be discussed with the Network Technology Area Director but Education WG will be dropped by the Application Technology Area
* The participants support the changes in the NRW leadership as follows: Prof Jun Matsukata will be the next Chair, Prof. Xing Li will be the co-chair for the first year of next term
* Decided to keep the ad-hoc committee (Strategy Committee) since there are still lots of other matters to be resolved
* Accepted the changes in the leadership in Fellowship Committee as follows: new chair is Nooraida Naser from Malaysia,
Jennifer/Jie An will be the co-chair till the next summer meeting in 2006
* The current Election Committee will ask for nominations for the positions of:
- Chair and Vice-Chairs of APAN;
- Committee Chairs (including Task Force and Net Group);
- NOC and Area Directors; and
- other positions deemed appropriate

before the Tokyo meeting, including nominations for the election committee itself. Will ask the current election committee members to agree to seek nominations for all positions becoming vacant in 2006 around October/November 2005. This would allow members to have time to make nominations in plenty of time for the January meeting inTokyo.